Independence Day


I love Independence Day. It is hands down, my favorite secular holiday.

With all the history and the deep meaning of a great number of things which resulted in this day two-hundred and forty-three years ago, it’s hard not to be overwhelmed by the simplicity of it. At the same time, to also understand that it was only an end of one phase and the beginning of another. The “Revolution,” John Adams once said, was actually over. Now began the fight for liberty and the ideals of that revolution. Which – by the by – we are still fighting for today.

Above all else, the American experience is about perseverance. It is about staying on the course to the ideal through all the attempts to sidetrack or derail the journey. It is another reminder that I have a responsibility to pass on my passion and beliefs to my son so that he can help to continue the journey towards a more perfect Union.

The bigger part of that journey began when it became necessary to declare the causes which impelled us to separate ourselves from Great Britain…


Special Thanks to Alex the News Guy for his reading of the Declaration of Independence…


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The Man Who Knows Where To Tap



A long time ago, in a place… well… 4.8 miles from here… a wise man told me a story to teach me a great truth. I have carried that story in my head for nearly forty years, and the recent defeat that I have suffered at the hands of my kitchen sink has reminded me that the reason for the story remains as true today as the day it first was told in 1908.

It is also why I had no time today to do any research or think at all about my reaction to the President of the United States stepping into North Korea. I mean, obviously, it’s a big deal and all, but there seems like there should be some deeper meaning to it.

And maybe that meaning is found in the skies overhead, where the International Space Station floated by at 0430 this morning as Ben and I stood in the street and watched in awe?


The Wayback Machine




I realize that there are certain subjects about which one is not allowed to express an opinion, solely depending on the hue of one’s dermis. That said, I have come to believe that a good deal of our problems can be traced to the idea that your or my opinion cannot have any value whatsoever because I don’t like you or you don’t like me. As Ovid once said, “It is right to learn. Even from one’s opponent” (yes, that’s a paraphrase because the Latin does not exactly translate into English, deal with it).

During the Democrat Party Not-a-Debate last week, Senator Kamala Harris blasted former Vice-President and Senator Joe Biden over his “record” on Court ordered mandatory busing of students to different schools during the 1970s. It was a planned line, as her Campaign immediately began selling T-Shirts with the phrase, “I was That Little Girl” on them for a mere $30 “donation” to her campaign fund.

A wise man once said that a piece of cloth with only one side makes for awful thin material. Much like the debate over reparations for slavery, there is another side to this Busing issue that gets lost and somehow or another forgotten. What is that side? Well… let’s get in the Wayback Machine and travel back to 1974, in Denver, Colorado…


Droning On




On Friday, the President said that he called off a retaliatory strike against Iran with just “ten minutes to spare.” Ostensibly the strike (or strikes?) were in response to the Iranian shooting down of an American reconnaissance drone and the recent attack on two oil tankers in the Persian Gulf, which the Administration is convinced were conducted by Iranian naval forces.

In his Tweets* the President expressed concern that as many as one hundred and fifty people could die in the strike(s) and that this cost was not “in proportion” to the shooting down of an unmanned drone. Given that, he called off the attack with minutes to spare and announced that he would try diplomatic pressure to resolve the issue.

Depending on what Media you consume, this was either a foolish thing for the President to do, or it was outrageous or a growing corner of the interwebs feels that his statement is hyperbole. Some mock the “no people on board” comments without context; others praise his discretion and willingness to back away from the abyss.

So where does all of this leave us?

I spent the weekend waiting for one specific piece of information that I believe would confirm or disprove my thoughts on the matter. That specific piece of data never – or at least not yet – has not been made available. That missing point has me wondering about the whole adventure. Frankly, I believe that there was a strike laid on and it was called off at a very late – possibly the last possible – moment.

On Saturday, it was announced that with the Presidents personal approval (just let it rattle around your head for a second), the US was (or had) conducted significant cyberattacks on Iran, specifically targeting their C3 systems that control their anti-air missile defense systems.

That leaves me with more questions than answers and much wondering about what is going to happen next…


*A week ago I told you that the Press Secretary is no longer needed. The Presidents handling of the calling off of the Iran Strike(s) via Twitter supports my hypothesis.


24

Supreme Rulings



As the 2018-19 Supreme Court Session winds down, three rulings have recently been released that have the attention of talking heads everywhere.

Joining Dave to chat about then is Pat the Lawyer from Constitution Thursday – The Saturday Podcast. First up, the Bladensburg Cross has passions running high, but the Court reached a 7-2 decision that this specific cross is NOT unconstitutional.

Next up, the Gundy case has Progressives apoplectic over Justice Alito’s concurrence to uphold the law which allows Congress to delegate to the Attorney General the control of rules constraining sexual offenders. In an unusual 5-3 ruling, Justice Alito made it clear that he would be happy to overturn the non-delegation doctrine, just not today…

Last up is the much ballyhooed Gamble case, in which the Court upheld the Dual Sovereignty Doctrine. This isn’t just bad news for Mr. Gamble, but is a clear loss for the Administration and specifically President Trump. A bigger question, though, is why did the Prosecutors in Alabama feel the need to hammer Mr. Gamble?


Frederick Muhlenberg




In the wake of the elections of 1788, the 1st Congress of The United States began to gather in New York.

To say that absolutely nobody had any clue what to do would be the understatement of the last two centuries. Sure, they had the rules laid out in Article I and plenty of experience in State Legislatures, but nobody had any idea if this would actually work or not. Two States had not yet ratified the Constitution and consequently had not even held elections for the new Congress. Travel times were much different than today, as horses or walking were the only ways to get from there to here. Things were slow.

From March 4th, when the Congress convened, it would take a month before a quorum could be achieved. And before a single piece of legislation could be presented, debated or passed, the first order of business in the House was to elect the 1st Speaker of the House. In the Congress of a nation that was as yet strongly divided, the new Speaker was elected on the very first ballot. It was pretty much the only thing that went easy.

The hurdles faced by the 1st Congress were things that we take for granted in today’s Country. At least half of the Congressmen in New York believed that the new Constitution was not sustainable and that New Yorkers – and by extension Northerners – were conspiring to keep the Nations new capital in New York. As James Madison said, “We are in a wilderness with not a single footstep to guide us.”

And so with the Constitution as their guide and the son of a German Immigrant Luthern Pastor, Frederick Muhlenberg, at the gavel, things got underway…


LoDo



A few days ago while getting ready for the show about Sara Sanders, I ran a test Press Conference on my Facebook page. There I was asked two questions that I really want to answer, the first of which was: Did the years you spent assisting the homeless make you more compassionate or less?

Although many people who listen to me talk about the homeless would assume that I have become less compassionate towards them, the actual answer is neither more nor less. Why? Because for all those years the one thing I have realized is that nobody is really interested in addressing the real problem. All that is done is spending money on pretending to care solutions that make governments bigger and more expensive while doing nothing whatsoever for the actual homeless…