The Man Who Knows Where To Tap



A long time ago, in a place… well… 4.8 miles from here… a wise man told me a story to teach me a great truth. I have carried that story in my head for nearly forty years, and the recent defeat that I have suffered at the hands of my kitchen sink has reminded me that the reason for the story remains as true today as the day it first was told in 1908.

It is also why I had no time today to do any research or think at all about my reaction to the President of the United States stepping into North Korea. I mean, obviously, it’s a big deal and all, but there seems like there should be some deeper meaning to it.

And maybe that meaning is found in the skies overhead, where the International Space Station floated by at 0430 this morning as Ben and I stood in the street and watched in awe?


The Good Old Days



Over the weekend, a Russian destroyer made a run at the USS Chancellorsville, nearly causing a collision between the two ships. This has much of the world in a tizzy, but the reality is that once upon a time this was a fairly common occurrence. If not common, at least not something about which governments and news agencies got their knickers in a wad over.

But the whole thing, along with the return of the Peace Protestors to the gates of Bangor, has Dave reminisces about his own time during the Cold War aboard USS Michigan SSBN-727(G). It was an amazing experience in a beautiful place…


May 28, 1981


Thirty-Eight years ago today, I skipped my last day of High School, raised my right hand, kept my left hand by my side (not on a Bible), and swore to uphold and defend the Constitution of the United States.

I’ve said before that in the big scheme of things, I had no clue what that would mean. I knew that I had a right to keep and bear arms, some free speech, and my religion, but beyond that, it was just a glaze of patriotism and the flag, wrapped up with a belief that I knew what I was doing. Don’t get me wrong, if I had a time machine and could go back to that day and give myself some advice, it would be to do it. This time though, understand that this is just the first step of a very long journey.

To say that I have changed would be a ridiculous understatement. To say that my understanding of things has changed would be to say that I’ve grown up from the seventeen-year-old kid I was that day.

The Only Thing We Know




1968 was a bad year for submarines. The French, the Israelis, the Russians, and the United States all lost boats that year. For the US, the loss of Scorpion has proven to be particularly vexing. Even in Submarine School in 1982 it was discussed and debated.

At the end of the day, there are several theories as to what happened. Was it a Russian torpedo in retaliation for the loss of K-129? was it a hot running Mk 37 that couldn’t be shut down and detonated in the torpedo room? Was it a battery that exploded? Why did at least one crew member try to escape?

When everything is said and done, when we think about the loss of 99 men on this day in 1968, there is really only one thing that we know.

And that is that we don’t know…


Feres Declined


Yesterday, it was announced that the Supreme Court had declined to hear a case which was challenging the Feres Doctrine. This is a long-standing SCOTUS ruling that military personnel are not permitted to sue the Government for medical malpractice or in the event of injury, illness or even death.

Many, including two sitting Associate Justices, have criticized the Doctrine for its unfairness. But is it really unfair?